Site icon San Francisco News

Dangerous Concrete Slab Causes Building Evacuations

SAN FRANCISCO—A concrete slab and concrete pump were at risk of falling off of the top of a skyscraper resulting in the evacuation of several buildings in San Francisco on Wednesday, February 15.

The building, located at 41 Tehama Street south of Market Street, was evacuated by firefighters.

According to officials, no residential buildings were affected and they recommended that workers and residents go home and stay safe by leaving the area.

The concrete slab was located on the 30th floor of the building, which resulted in firefighters evacuating the surrounding buildings including 41, 44, 56 and 58 Tehama Street.

In total, 16 buildings were evacuated because of the incident including buildings 543, 531, 527, 505, 547, 555 and 557 on Howard Street.

The 500 block of Howard Street was shut down for hours, but re-opened around 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday.

“The building itself is not damaged or compromised in any way shape or form,” said San Francisco Fire Chief Tom Siragusa. “It is the crane that is sitting on top of it and the forms that are holding it up that are of concern at this point.”

On Wednesday, the SFPD released the following statement via their Twitter account from Hines and Invesco Real Estate:

“This afternoon, an incident occurred at the 33 Tehama site between levels 35 and 36 where an interior forming system had a partial hydraulic failure while being raised to the next level. The interior forming system and the concrete placement arm have been secured and are being evaluated by engineers to bring it back to level. No injuries and or damage have been reported. Please note the boom is located in the center of the top level. This is NOT the crane attached to the outside of the building. Previous reports that a 2,000 pound slab of concrete is in danger of falling are also false. 33 Tehama is being developed by Hines and Invesco Real Estate. Lendlease is the general contractor.”

According to the San Francisco Fire Department, if the slab falls, it will most likely damage the surrounding buildings.

Written By Joy Kalu and Donald Roberts

Exit mobile version